RIM execs dish details on BlackBerry 10, BES 10 and the enterprise

By , CIO |  Consumerization of IT, BlackBerry, blackberry 10

"This is something that's very unique to the BlackBerry experience, this ability to put the second version of the application out there and really isolate the use cases between the two."

That sounds great from an enterprise perspective, but do users really want to flip back and forth between multiple "phones" in a single piece of hardware?

"As an end user of a device, I don't want to make that mistake [of accidentally misusing a work app]. So if the device can help me do my job better, it becomes a more compelling experience to me," says Holleran.

For a detailed look at Blackberry Balance, visit RIM's BlackBerry for Business blog.

BlackBerry Enterprise Service (BES) 10

Last month, RIM released the first official information on its upcoming BlackBerry Enterprise Service (BES) 10, which will eventually integrate the company's current BlackBerry, iOS and Android management services into one product.

Right now, RIM's BlackBerry Mobile Fusion product is used to manage BlackBerry PlayBook tablets and iOS and Android devices, and its BlackBerry Enterprise Server (BES) manages current in-market BlackBerry devices. The initial version of BES 10 will be released along with the first BlackBerry 10 devices in the first quarter of 2013, and RIM will release an update in May 2013 to integrate the various components so they can run on a single server.

One of the most notable enterprise enhancements in BES 10 is the use of Microsoft ActiveSync technology as a sync engine, according to Holleran.

"One of the challenges that enterprises have faced with these [non BlackBerry] devices is that they're not interested in exposing ActiveSync out to the public Internet," he says. "We've solved that with the simple change for us, of BES 5, the proprietary messaging protocols, BES 10 and the switch out over to ActiveSync as our sync engine. We didn't change out anything that we did around the rest of it. The security is all there, the transport is all there. We just changed out the sync engine service."


Originally published on CIO |  Click here to read the original story.
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