Sex, spies & videotape: Seven things we can learn from the Pentagon sex scandal

The scandal engulfing General Petraeus, Paula Broadwell, and assorted friends offers valuable lessons in privacy -- or the lack thereof -- for all of us.

By  

We don’t yet know why Paula Broadwell had thousands of classified documents on her computer and in paper files at her house, but we do know that was a bad idea. She was, after all, a security analyst for the military with sufficient security clearance to read them. She may have just been using the material for her book. Still, taking sensitive files home is almost always a bad idea. And when you're sleeping with the boss, it's a really bad idea.

If your job requires it, you need to a) secure it while in motion, and b) get sign off from someone above you willing to take the heat if they get lost or stolen. 

4. It’s always better to keep your shirt on

Until the New York Times revealed his name, Agent Humphries was known only as Agent Shirtless, after it became known that he’d shared a topless photo of himself with Kelley. That nickname is likely to stick with him for the rest of his semi-nude life. The rule here: If you take a digital photo of yourself in any partially undressed state and share it with anyone else, up to and including your mother, it will eventually find its way on to the Webbernets – guaranteed. (We’ll leave aside the question of why you’d be sending semi-dressed pix to mom for the time being.) And unless you’re ripped like Arnold Schwarzenegger, the world really doesn’t want to see you with your shirt off. Really. So button up.

5. Skeletons hate closets

Got a deep dark secret you’ve kept carefully hidden? It probably won’t stay secret for long, especially if you fall into the maw of insatiable 24/7 media hounds. And that’s why we now know that Paula Broadwell was a spokesmodel for a manufacturer of semi-automatic weapons, or that both Jill Kelley and her twin sister Natalie Khawam were heavily in debt and involved in what might turn out to be a bogus cancer charity. (Also, they both got their photo taken with Florida congressman Marco Rubio – you can bet that will feature prominently in his campaign literature when he goes for the Republican VP nod in 2016.)

Your best defense: Do a thorough background check on yourself and update it at least once a year. That way at least you’ll know what’s out there; you might even be able to persuade people to remove the skeezier stuff, if you’re nice about it.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

IT ManagementWhite Papers & Webcasts

See more White Papers | Webcasts

Answers - Powered by ITworld

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question
randomness