How to leave your job the right way

Who hasn't wanted to throw up their hands and just walk out of the office? Don't do it. Learn the proper etiquette for leaving your job and ensure that your career and reputation remain intact after you leave your current position.

By Rich Hein , CIO |  IT Management, IT jobs

If you aren't moving directly to a new job, contact two or three people whom you've worked with and ask them for a recommendation immediately after leaving, while memories are still fresh. You've got to put some thought into this. Whose testimonial will offer the most bang for the buck. It's also wise to ask these colleagues to mention specific areas of your expertise that will help you reach your goals. For example, if you're a content manager, but you are also a knowledgeable SEO person and you want to work as an SEO specialist, guide your colleague to talk about your proficiency with SEO. Another great resource for recommendations are clients and former employees. "If you have left a company and no one will talk on your behalf, that can be a problem. Have a reason to explain it and other references outside the company that are very strong," says Seidel.

The bottom-line--ask for recommendations and guide your referring colleagues.

Keep Things Positive and Low Key

Making a scene or bashing the company may work great in the movies, but in real-life these things are remembered and can come back to haunt you. It's often best to avoid the conversation altogether, but if you must then keep things on a positive note. "Use common sense and decency when exiting a company. Even if it's a bad situation, try to take the high road," says Seidel.

We've all heard the stories about people posting stupid things on Facebook or Twitter. If you work in IT and you don't think your next employer will peek at your social media profiles, then you're making a mistake. Announcing your new position is fine, but belittling your old boss or berating your former company will surely come back to bite you. Success is always the best revenge, and burning bridges is never a good idea, regardless of the situation.

Be Cautious of Exit Interviews

Exit interviews can be a tricky maneuver. While they are meant to be confidential, they are often shared. Be as diplomatic as you can. "No matter what you are told, assume that your feedback will get back to people. It is often a tough and personal decision as to whether you should use an exit interview to call out behavior in an organization you consider to be wrong or abusive. One question to consider in making such a decision--do I think the issues I experienced were an anomaly or part of the culture?" says Seidel.


Originally published on CIO |  Click here to read the original story.
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