BYOD planning and costs: Everything you need to know

By , CIO |  Consumerization of IT, BYOD

A big reason for this is the hidden cost of processing expense reports. A BYOD policy will undoubtedly lead to employees filing more expense reports. A single expense report costs about $18 to process, says Aberdeen. (For more on this, see BYOD: If You Think You're Saving Money, Think Again.)

And it gets worse. "Chances are, if you have all these BYOD expense reports, you may need telecom expense management software," says Schofield. "That'll run you $3 to $4 per user, per month."

Training costs: Expense reports can lead to another hidden cost, in the form of BYOD training. In the old days of corporate-issued smartphones, IT traditionally monitored use. Any spikes in data usage or minutes could be automatically flagged.

In today's expense report-driven BYOD environment, other groups will be making sure employees don't game the system. Will these groups have the capability to monitor BYOD smartphone usage? Will they even know what to look for?

"Training is one of the biggest costs, but I don't know how to track it," Schofield says.

Support costs: Much has been written about BYOD support costs because it's such a moving target. CIOs who have ushered in a BYOD smartphone mandate say that the actual number of BYOD smartphones is almost always more than the previous number of corporate-issued smartphones, yet the percentage of help desk tickets decline.

It's important to look at the total number of help desk tickets, not the percentage. Chances are you'll find that your IT department is handling more tickets. It's a hidden cost of BYOD.

Project rollout costs: Nothing increases cost like a project that starts and stops, and starts and stops again. BYOD is one of those projects. The problem is that BYOD touches all parts of an organization: IT, legal, HR, finance, business units, even maybe customers.

A common case: BYOD smartphones get pushed out by IT as the CIO hopes to reap cost savings. Business units get involved to determine which employees are eligible, which, in turn, drags in the human resources department. The process gets bogged down because the finance department realizes it has to deal with the expense reporting. Legal comes late to the game to hash out employee privacy issues.

If all these departments aren't involved from the get-go, Schoefield says, "it's going to be a long slide."

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Originally published on CIO |  Click here to read the original story.
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