Lessig, Demand Progress support investigation of Swartz prosecutor

Congress should also pass Aaron's Law to decriminalize terms of service violations, Lessig and Demand Progress say

By , IDG News Service |  IT Management, Aaron Swartz

Lawrence Lessig

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flickr/Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy

Demand Progress, the tech activist group founded by the late Aaron Swartz, and Harvard law professor Lawrence Lessig have called on supporters to press the U.S. Congress to investigate Swartz's prosecuting attorney and to pass a law to decriminalize the type of hacking he was charged with.

The 26-year-old Swartz, faced with a 35-year prison sentence for hacking into a Massachusetts Institute of Technology network and downloading research articles, committed suicide last Friday.

Lessig, a long-time tech activist and commentator, and Demand Progress, a group founded by Swartz to fight the Stop Online Piracy Act, asked supporters to back an investigation by U.S. Representative Darrell Issa, a California Republican, into U.S. Attorney for Massachusetts Carmen Ortiz's prosecution of Swartz.

Lessig and Demand Progress also asked supporters to contact their lawmakers in support of Aaron's Law, proposed legislation from Representative Zoe Lofgren, a California Democrat, that would amend the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act to decriminalize violations of terms of service agreements.

"We spent Tuesday burying and mourning our friend Aaron," Lessig and Demand Progress said in a letter released Thursday. "We're sad, we're tired, we're frustrated -- and we're angry at a system that let this happen to Aaron. Now we want to set upon honoring his life's work and helping to make sure that such a travesty is never repeated."

Decriminalizing terms of use violations would be an important step, the letter said. The current law makes TOS or user agreement violations felonies even though those agreements are "that fine print you never read before you check the box next to it," the letter said. "That's how over-broad this dangerous statute is, and one way it lets showboating prosecutors file charges against people who've done nothing wrong."

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