Lawmakers pledge to change hacking law during Swartz memorial

The Computer Fraud and Abuse Act gives prosecutors too much authority, lawmakers say

By , IDG News Service |  IT Management, Aaron Swartz

Aaron Swartz

Demand Progress founder and director Aaron Swartz speaks out against SOPA and PIPA.

flickr/selfagency

U.S. lawmakers pledged to rewrite an antihacking law as hundreds of people gathered in Washington, D.C., to mourn the death of Internet activist and innovator Aaron Swartz.

Speakers at a Monday memorial service for Swartz, who committed suicide in January, remembered him as an intensely curious young man who wanted to help people and change the world. The world is a "worse place" because of Swartz's death, said his girlfriend, Taren Stinebrickner-Kauffman.

Swartz was "one of the brightest stars in America," Stinebrickner-Kauffman said. "He had so much more to do."

As a teenager, Swartz played key roles in the development of the RSS online content syndication technology, in the creation of the Creative Commons licenses and in the founding of the Reddit news sharing site. He later cofounded Demand Progress, a left-leaning activist group focused on technology policy and other issues.

He died facing charges that could have led to a 35-year jail sentence and a $1 million fine for allegedly hacking into a Massachusetts Institute of Technology network and downloading millions of scholarly articles from the JSTOR subscription service. Swartz wanted to make the articles available for free.

Swartz was brilliant, but his stubbornness and impulsiveness could be frustrating, Stinebrickner-Kauffman said. "He was always asking for forgiveness instead of permission," she said.

Several speakers at the memorial service, including four lawmakers, called for changes in the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA), which prosecutors in Massachusetts used to charge him. While some computer hacking laws are appropriate, prosecutors went too far in pressing for a lengthy jail sentence, said Representative Darrell Issa, a California Republican.

"The crime and the punishment have to fit," Issa said.

Lawmakers said the law gives prosecutors too much authority to bring charges in hactivism cases where there's little damage to the victims. "We are going to change this unjust law," said Senator Ron Wyden, an Oregon Democrat.

Swartz was charged in July 2011 with computer intrusion, fraud and data theft.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question
randomness