9 tips for how to use operating level agreements in multisourcing

By Stephanie Overby, CIO |  IT Management, outsourcing

Operating level agreements (OLA) aren't exactly new to IT. Unlike service level agreements (SLA) between an IT organization and its service provider, OLAs state how particular parties involved in the process of delivering IT services will interact with each other in order to maintain performance.

"By establishing OLAs between these groups, the IT function can provide the appearance of seamless service to the business," says Edward Hansen, partner with law firm Baker & McKenzie.

[ Related: Is Integration-as-a-Service the IT Model of the Future? ]

Until recently, OLAs were most often internal to an IT organization or a single large service provider, ensuring that the groups within the organization were working together to deliver IT services. But with the rise of multisourcing, OLAs are back in the spotlight.

"In this context an OLA becomes a record of shared assumptions and interdependencies at the level of processes shared and intersecting between each of the multiple parties engaged in the delivery of services," says Les Druitt, founding principal of outsourcing consultancy Sourcing Advisory Services. "It is where the rubber meets the road in a multi-party outsourcing."

[ Related: 5 Outsourcing Trends to Watch ]

"It has become more and more important for the ultimate customer to know that the relationships and interactions among these multiple parties are well-known, documented in clear and precise language, and reflected in binding agreements that can be enforced-if necessary-by the customer," says partner Robert Zahler, partner in global sourcing group at law firm Pillsbury.

How to Use OLAs in a Multi-Sourced Setting

Establishing OLAs in the multi-sourced environment, however, is inherently more difficult than instituting them within a single organization.

"There is limited understanding of this new role, what level of description is sufficient, the role the OLAs play in validating both pricing and solution assumptions, and in facilitating continuous improvement," Druitt says. "Creating OLAs for the purposes of documenting and confirming how solutions will play in harmony requires a collaborative process to arrive at a set of documents that all parties respect and support."

Here are nine dos and don'ts for establishing OLAs in the multi-sourced IT environment.


Originally published on CIO |  Click here to read the original story.
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