Android does not infringe on Nokia patent, German court rules

A "major setback" to Nokia's attempt to license its non-essential patents to Android handset manufacturers, defendant HTC said

By Loek Essers, IDG News Service |  IT Management

In a separate judgment handed down on Friday, the Mannheim court also dismissed an infringement complaint by Nokia alleging that HTC infringed EP1312974 (the 974 patent). That patent is entitled "Electronic Display Device and Lighting Control Method of Same", and relates to a method for controlling the lighting of a display in an electronic device, lighting the display on the basis of the ambient light.

HTC said it was "extremely pleased" by the court's second decision and will also continue the invalidity actions against the '974 patents pending in the U.K. and Germany. In this case too, HTC expects the German Federal Patents Court to revoke the patent before any appeal by Nokia is filed, it said.

"While 974 patent is apparently less important to Nokia than the 120 patent, this decision nevertheless represents another major setback for Nokia in its attempt to license its non-essential patents to Android handset manufacturers," HTC said.

In May 2012, Nokia filed claims against HTC, Research In Motion and Viewsonic in the U.S. and Germany alleging that products from those companies infringe a number of Nokia patents. Nokia wants the companies to pay licensing fees. Nokia settled its dispute with the BlackBerry maker in December when the companies entered into a licensing agreement. HTC however, decided to continue its dispute with Nokia in various courtrooms.

"Nokia respectfully disagrees with the courts decision and we are considering our options," said Nokia spokesman Mark Durrant in an email. "As we said in May 2012, we took these actions to end HTCs unauthorized use of our proprietary innovations and technologies. A further 34 Nokia patents have been asserted against HTC in other actions brought by Nokia in Germany and the U.S. and we anticipate that we shall prevail in these. HTC must respect our intellectual property and compete using its own innovations," he added.

Loek is Amsterdam Correspondent and covers online privacy, intellectual property, open-source and online payment issues for the IDG News Service. Follow him on Twitter at @loekessers or email tips and comments to loek_essers@idg.com

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