US defense scientist bought pirated software from Russians, Chinese, DOJ says

The pirated software was used to design components for military helicopters, including the president's Marine One fleet

By , IDG News Service |  IT Management

The former chief scientist at a Kentucky defense contractor has been sentenced to a year in prison for buying pirated software from Russian and Chinese hackers and using it to design components for military helicopters.

Wronald Best, 55, of Owensboro, Kentucky, purchased the modeling and design software, with a retail value of more than US$2.3 million, for use at his job with MPD, a manufacturer of military and law enforcement equipment, the U.S. Department of Justice said.

An investigation by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) unit found that Best was one of the top customers for Crack99.com, a site that sells pirated software, in 2008 and 2009, the DOJ said.

Best told special agents that he used the software to conduct simulations on components MPD was designing for use in military helicopters, including the Black Hawk helicopter and the presidential helicopter fleet, commonly referred to as Marine One, the DOJ said. Other projects on which Best used cracked software included designing Patriot missile components, police radars and breath analysis equipment widely used by American police departments.

Best was sentenced Monday in U.S. District Court for the District of Delaware for conspiracy to commit criminal copyright infringement.

The DOJ and investigators with HSI accused Best of encouraging Chinese national Xiang Li and a Russian hacker to pirate copies of defense modeling programs and other software.

Xiang Li and a partner sold cracked copies of software on websites including Crack99.com and Cad100.com between April 2008 and November 2010, according to court documents. Many of the software packages they sold had retail values of $10,000 or more.

Best communicated electronically with about 35 different computer code crackers and purchased more than 60 pirated software titles from Chinese and Russian sources, according to court documents. He paid more than $6,000 to obtain pirated software worth more than $2.3 million, the DOJ said.

Li pleaded guilty in January to one count of conspiracy to commit copyright infringement and one count of conspiracy to commit wire fraud. He's awaiting sentencing.

The software piracy conspiracy raised investigator concerns that sophisticated modeling software, some of which was on a U.S. restricted export list, was falling into the wrong hands, said John Kelleghan, special agent in charge at HSI Philadelphia. 

Best was working on sensitive government projects and "gets into cahoots with a Chinese national and Russian cybercriminals," Kelleghan said. U.S. agencies need to be able to trust their contracting partners, and Best "absolutely failed" in his security agreements with the government, he added.

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