US allows export of communication devices, software and services to Iran

The U.S. aims to provide the Iranian people with safer, more sophisticated personal communications equipment

By , IDG News Service |  IT Management

The U.S. government has lifted sanctions on the export of a variety of consumer communications devices, software and services including mobile phones to Iran ahead of elections in that country.

The U.S. Department of the Treasury, in consultation with the U.S. Department of State, has issued a license authorizing the export to Iran of certain personal communications services, software and hardware, it said on Thursday.

Exports of the devices to Iran had been blocked since the 1990s, but the U.S. government now holds that the new license aims to empower the Iranian people as their government intensifies its efforts to stifle their access to information.

The export of the equipment to the Iranian government or to any individual or entity on a Specially Designated Nationals list continued to be prohibited.

"As the Iranian government attempts to silence its people by cutting off their communication with each other and the rest of the world, the United States will continue to take action to help the Iranian people exercise their universal human rights, including the right to freedom of expression," according to a statement by the two U.S. departments.

The license, which came into effect Thursday, allows for the export and re-export from the U.S. of fee-based services, software and hardware required for personal communications over the Internet, including instant messaging, email, chat, social networking, sharing of photos and movies, web browsing and blogging.

The products, software, and services now authorized for export to Iran include mobile phones, personal digital assistants, satellite phones, computers, consumer network equipment, anti-tracking software, anti-censorship tools, virtual private networks, proxy tools and voice-over-IP and video chat tools.

The National Iranian American Council had earlier asked the U.S. government to lift sanctions on communication tools, with elections for a new president for Iran scheduled for June.

Referring to the killing of 26-year-old Neda Agha-Soltan during protests after the last presidential elections in Iran in 2009, the council pointed out that the video of her death which had an impact worldwide over the Internet was available "because an ordinary person in Iran broke U.S. sanctions." The Green Movement, opposing the ruling regime, used social media extensively in its protests.

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