Why you should challenge your boss

Inside dissent and other key traits of loyal employees

By , ITworld |  

Your organization's planning a major project and you have questions - big, potentially derailing concerns. Yet in every meeting, all you hear are choruses of agreement and all you see are heads nodding in approval with management as everyone happily forges ahead.

Do you express your honest opinion or go along to get along?

Dharmesh Shah, CEO of HubSpot, says dissenting from the majority is actually one of the best qualities of a loyal employee.

"Every great company fosters debate and disagreement. Every great leader wants employees to question, to deliberate, and to push back," Shah says. "Weighing the positives and negatives of a decision, sharing conflicting opinions, playing devil's advocate… disagreement is healthy. It’s stimulating. It leads to better decisions."

Other signs to identify the best of the best:

They compliment their coworkers
Praising peers goes beyond a pat on the back, Shah says. Through the move, such employees show they sincerely care about their coworkers, the company and its goals. And, Shah notes, care is the foundation of loyalty.

They exercise integrity
Dedicated employees will refuse a request if they believe it's unethical or illegal. They believe that doing what's right not only serves their conscience, but also the greater good of the company and management in the long run.

They back the company in public.
Even if the company takes on a direction or project with which they disagree, loyal staffers will support that decision as if it were their own, Shaw says.

"A truly loyal employee puts aside his feelings and actively tries to make every decision the right decision – instead of willing it to fail so they can prove themselves right," he adds.

For more on traits of the truly loyal, click below.
via LinkedIn

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