Google Glass user questioned in Ohio theater for suspected piracy

The person was allowed to go after it was found that he was not using Google Glass to record the movie

By , IDG News Service |  IT Management

Google Glass has raised privacy concerns in many countries. It now appears that it is being monitored as a potential aid to copyright infringement.

A man who wore Google Glass to a movie theater in Ohio was detained and interrogated by officials of the Department of Homeland Security, highlighting concerns that the device may be used by people to illegally record movies at a theater.

A spokesman for the Motion Picture Association of America, which works closely with theaters all over the U.S. to curb camcording and "theater-originated piracy," said Tuesday that no such activity was discovered in the particular case.

The DHS could not be immediately reached for comment.

In an account to the Gadgeteer, the unnamed person said he went to AMC theater in Easton Mall in Columbus, Ohio, on Saturday to watch a movie with his wife. "Because I don't want Glass to distract me during the movie, I turn them off (but since my prescription lenses are on the frame, I still wear them)," he told the gadget review website.

DHS officials questioned the person and let him go after they determined he was not using the device to record the film, a source close to the situation said.

AMC Theatres confirmed in a message on Twitter that "it is true that a guest with a potential recording device inside the auditorium was questioned at our AMC Easton 30." The theater had contacted MPAA investigators and later referred the issue to the DHS, according to the source.

Google was not immediately available for comment.

"Google Glass is an incredible innovation in the mobile sphere, and we have seen no proof that it is currently a significant threat that could result in content theft," the MPAA spokesman said via email.

Users of Google Glass have had brushes with the law on other occasions. A court in Southern California dismissed earlier this month a traffic citation issued for wearing Google Glass while driving. The driver was stopped and issued a ticket for speeding. She got the second ticket after the California Highway Patrol officer noticed that she was wearing Google Glass.

The court commissioner dismissed the charge, saying he found no evidence that the device was in operation at the time, according to reports. The woman, Cecilia Abadie, had been cited for breaking a California state law that bars motorists from having video screens for entertainment or business applications in their line of sight while driving.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

IT ManagementWhite Papers & Webcasts

See more White Papers | Webcasts

Answers - Powered by ITworld

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question
randomness