3G patent disputed by Apple, HTC and Nokia upheld by European Patent Office

Patent owner IPCom will start several damages and infringement cases in the coming months

By , IDG News Service |  IT Management

The European Patent Office (EPO) has upheld a narrowed version of a patent on 3G technology at the heart of several legal disputes in Germany, an EPO spokesman said Thursday.

By upholding the patent, which its owner IPCom has declared essential to 3G standards, the EPO rejected claims from Nokia, HTC, Apple, Ericsson and Vodafone, which opposed the patent, the spokesman said.

The EPO had previously denied a broader version of the patent, but on Wednesday upheld IPCom's narrower redrafting of it, according to the EPO spokesman. The decision can be appealed, but it is not yet clear whether that will happen, he said.

The patent describes the allocation of network access via the so-called Random Access Channel (RACH), allowing handsets access to the networks of the various mobile telecommunications providers, said IPCom, in a news release. "As such, it is standard-essential within the UMTS and LTE standards, and its use is mandatory," it said.

Standard essential patents (SEPs) are patents that the owner deems essential to the implementation of industry standards. Companies that declare their patents as standards-essential are usually required to license them on fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory (FRAND) terms. Would-be licensees, however, often disagree about what constitutes a reasonable licensing fee.

The technology described in the IPCom patent, originally developed by Bosch, is particularly important for the emergency services and police, since it can give them priority access to networks in emergencies, even if the networks are overloaded, according to IPCom.

IPCom said smartphones made by Nokia, HTC and others currently deviate from the UMTS 3G standard in their use of the Random Access Channel, claiming they did this to avoid paying license fees. However, they are still solving the same problem using a slightly different technology, and that is not enough to avoid infringing the patent, said an IPCom spokesman.

Nokia spokesman Mark Durrant said that the version of IPCom's patent upheld by the EPO was so substantially narrowed that it will have no effect on Nokia.

"Nokia does not believe that it is possible for any UMTS product to infringe the narrowed form of the patent. Yet again, IPCom appears to be overestimating the value of its remaining patent," he said via email.

But IPCom also accused the handset vendors of putting public safety at risk in their attempts to avoid patent infringement. If the vendors were to deviate from the standard far enough to fall outside the scope of IPCom's patent, they would also fall outside of the UMTS standard, which could interfere with the correct functioning of the network and lead to a security risk in an emergency, the spokesman said.

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