How to kickstart your data-driven marketing efforts

By Thor Olavsrud, CIO |  IT Management, Marketing

Marketing professionals agree that big data analytics will become a major component of their business over the next several years. In fact, according to a survey conducted by Teradata in March and May last year, 71% say they plan to implement big data analytics within the next two years -- all part of taking their data-driven marketing efforts to the next level.

Most marketers already leverage data, of course: customer service data, customer satisfaction data, digital interaction data and demographic data. But the new era of data-driven marketing combines collecting and connecting large amounts of data, rapidly analyzing it and gaining insights, and then bringing those insights to market via marketing interactions tailored to what's relevant for each customer. Teradata predicts that by 2016, marketing organizations that successfully leverage big data for microsegmentation and targeting will achieve response rates of 70% or better.

To achieve that, marketers need to combine the traditional data their companies have collected with interaction data (like data pulled from social media), integrating both online and offline data sources to create a single view of their customer.

Naturally, it goes without saying that getting your data-driven marketing efforts in gear is much easier said than done. To help get you started, Teradata put together this infographic with 10 tips for jumpstarting your data-driven marketing efforts.

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Originally published on CIO |  Click here to read the original story.
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