Study disputes predictions of coming spectrum crunch

Mobile traffic growth has often been slower than predictions by several analysts, the paper says

By , IDG News Service |  IT Management

Picture of a couple sitting in a stadium surround by lots of empty seats.

Turns out the mobile spectrum might not be as crowded in the near future as some claim

Image credit: REUTERS/Dylan Martinez

Widely accepted projections of a shortage of mobile spectrum may not be as dire as many analysts in the mobile and tech sectors are making it out to be, according to a new study.

Projections on the growth of mobile spectrum use in recent years have often overestimated the demand, with a growing use of Wi-Fi to offload mobile data traffic contributing to inaccuracies, according to the paper, released this month by University of Southern California doctoral candidate Aalok Mehta and Goldin Associates managing director J. Armand Musey.

The paper, distributed but not paid for by mobile spectrum auction critic the National Association of Broadcasters [NAB], questioned the prevailing assumption in the mobile industry that there's a coming spectrum crunch, with multiple studies by Cisco Systems, Coda Research, the International Telecommunication Union and other analysts predicting a skyrocketing demand for mobile spectrum.

Although a coming spectrum crunch is "now taken almost as a matter of faith among telecommunications experts," many spectrum use predictions have had "persistent errors," the paper said.

"Our findings suggest the mobile industry contains much higher levels of inherent demand uncertainty than is commonly estimated and that business and governments may not be fully factoring it into their policy decisions," the study's authors wrote.

One major problem, the study said, is that government officials have used mobile spectrum use estimates to push for policy changes. The U.S. Federal Communications Commission and White House have both called for a transfer of 500MHz of spectrum to commercial mobile uses in the coming years, with both government entities apparently using mobile spectrum use estimates by Cisco and other analysts, the study said.

"When spectrum demand forecasts are inaccurate, governments may make inappropriate policy decision," the paper said. "Overestimating the growth of mobile network traffic crowds out other types of wireless communication by increasing spectrum scarcity."

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