WikiLeaks shows Apple fight with iPhone, iPad fakes in China

By , ITworld |  IT Management, Apple, China

Fake iPhones

flickr/ukhomeoffice

WikiLeaks reminds me of a car wreck – you know it's horrible, but you have to look as you drive by. Now the WikiLeaks spotlight is on Apple and their continuing battle with counterfeit products made in China. Since Apple's real products are made in China, catching counterfeiters becomes difficult, especially when Chinese intellectual property enforcement is, well, rudimentary.

But Apple should get props for fighting the good fight, and you can read the text of the smoking gun memo at CNN.com. Apple called in the group that helped Pfizer find and close bogus Viagra factories. Too bad they didn't shut off the spam pipeline advertising those pills.

The American Embassy in Beijing couldn't avoid the obvious pun (Apple Takes Bit out of Chines Fakes), and netizens can't avoid commenting on Apple news. Some think Apple is doing their best, some think Apple is slacking, and some don't like any part of this mess.

Apple is fighting the good fight

Ultimately, the best approach to solving the problem is to roll out Apple Stores wide and far, so that Chinese consumers know what a real Apple product looks like and thus are able to spot the fakes themselves.
ChKen on cnn.com

Note to Apple: Identify every part in your products built in China, and locate US companies who can provide the same parts at the same cost (I can assure you that there are companies here that could do this). Eliminate China from the vendor picture.
axual on appleinsider.com

I have found the easiest way to spot a fake is to look at the packaging which is often overlooked.. most of the counterfeit products are run on the same machines at the real ones which don't include the packaging systems.
LanMark17 on cnet.com

Apple is a lightweight fighting Chinese heavyweights

haha and does Apple actually think that the chinese will do anything about this 'problem'?
T Van Anger on latimes.com

Well, I'm loving seeing Apple's lawyers being described by the US government as inexperienced :-) Gives some levity to the work those imperious, trigger-happy buffoons do...
donwarne on cnet.com

If they're run on the same line, then one really cannot call it a fake. One can only call it a device for which Apple received no money.
paulej on cnet.com

It's China, don't be surprised

I'm sure the Chinese authorities will be all over this and protect Apple's IP!
dbtinc on appleinsider.com

You do not understand how China works, it is simply a job program, their goal is to have as many people working as possible, they do not allow automation to the extent that a human can do the job.
Maestro64 on appleinsider.com

I've purchased many products from sources around the globe. It is not uncommon for parts from China to be less half the cost of the cheapest U.S. manufacturer. And that's even assuming that you can still find the product manufactured in the U.S.
jragosta on appleinsider.com

Perhaps moving manufacturing to South or Central America might be a better idea. At least the corruption is closer to home, and perhaps easier to deal with.
Gromit801 on cnet.com

Can Apple stop Chinese counterfeits? (Yes / No).

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