PayPal unveils mobile payments for in-store shopping

No plans to rely on near-field communication

By , Computerworld |  Networking, mobile payments, paypal

While Thompson didn't rule out NFC, he did say, "We are not embracing technology," adding that working with NFC on a specific phone with a certain network and banks might only service "50 people out of 350 million people in the U.S."

Starbucks has also expressed concerns about the long lead time for NFC technology to develop and has relied instead on barcode scanning with smartphones to allow customers to make in-store purchases.

PayPal said in February it would start pilot programs of mobile payments within a year, but hasn't given more details on timing. It faces a number of competitors.

All the major credit card companies and many major U.S. banks have announced plans for mobile payments. Google said it would work with MasterCard and Sprint on launches later this year, while Visa has described separate initiatives. Isis, a consortium of three major wireless carriers, has plans for two pilots in 2012.

PayPal and its parent eBay have also filed a lawsuit against Google for stealing trade secrets related to mobile payments and point-of-sale strategies.

Matt Hamblen covers mobile and wireless, smartphones and other handhelds, and wireless networking for Computerworld. Follow Matt on Twitter at @matthamblen or subscribe to Matt's RSS feed . His e-mail address is mhamblen@computerworld.com .

Read more about mobile and wireless in Computerworld's Mobile and Wireless Topic Center.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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