IBM's Watson shows up for work at Cedars-Sinai's cancer center

Physicians could get advice from Watson in seconds

By , Computerworld |  IT Management, health care, IBM

IBM's Watson supercomputer is about to begun work evaluating evidence-based cancer treatment options that can be delivered to the physician in a matter of seconds for assessment.

IBM and WellPoint, which is Blue Cross Blue Shield's largest health plan, are building applications that will essentially turn the Watson computer into an adviser for oncologists at Cedars-Sinai's Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute in Los Angeles, according to Steve Gold, director of worldwide marketing for IBM Watson Solutions.

Cedars-Sinai's historical data on cancer as well as its current clinical records will be ingested into an iteration of IBM's Watson that will reside at WellPoint's headquarters. The computer will act as a medical data repository on multiple types of cancer. WellPoint will then work with Cedars-Sinai physicians to design and develop applications as well as validate their capabilities.

Dr. M. William Audeh, medical director of the cancer institute, will work closely with WellPoint's clinical experts to provide advice on how the Watson may be best used in clinical practice to support increased understanding of the evolving body of knowledge on cancer, including emerging therapies not widely known by physicians.

IBM announced earlier this year that healthcare would be the first commercial application for the computer, which defeated two human champions on the popular television game show Jeopardy! in February.

WellPoint partnered with IBM this fall to develop Watson-based applications intended to improve patient care through the use of evidence-based medicine, which is designed to standardize patient treatments by identifying proven best practices. A simple example of evidence-based medicine in action is when a provider automatically places someone who has suffered a heart attack on an aspirin regimen upon leaving the hospital. Cedars-Sinai is the first application of the partnership.

"Where Watson really lends itself to solving problems is information rich opportunities and the information is changing constantly and in various forms, structure and unstructured coming from disparate systems," IBM 's Gold said. "Healthcare fits that requirement exceptionally well."


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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