Up-and-coming tech jobs -- and how to land one

By Mary K. Pratt, Computerworld |  IT Management

They're also looking for deep knowledge of the organization's applications. "You have to understand the parts you're working with. You need to understand what's in there now," he says. "You need to know that [someone] might have put in a patch 10 years ago and never documented it."

Finally, they're looking for folks skilled in negotiating with and managing vendors. "There is absolutely a skill requirement around procurement, because so much of this is about procuring services," says Delattre.

Once an organization successfully moves to the cloud, does the job go away? Given the complexity of the task, Delattre says, cloud transition managers can expect to stay busy for at least the next several years, before transitions are complete and the job morphs into one focused on maintenance.

"This is a two-to-five-to-seven-year run, similar to what happened when we went from mainframe to client server and then again when we went to the Web," Delattre says.

Socialite

Companies of every size and stripe are implementing ever more ambitious strategies involving social media, so it's only logical that they need technologists who can make the most of their investments, says Rachel Russell, director of marketing at Hanover, Md.-based IT staffing firm TekSystems.

Some of them are moving to hire people who understand both the marketing value of social media as well as its technical complexities -- an acknowledgement that in most organizations social media has, up until now, been under the purview of either marketing or IT. Now, some are putting a new crossbreed of talent into positions with titles like chief social media strategist, new media coordinator, manager of social media and (less frequently) socialite.

"What you'll see with these positions is a tie-in to strategy. Companies want someone who can help them understand and define what the strategy is; [someone to say] 'Here's what we want the social media strategy to be,'" says Matthew Ripaldi, senior vice president of IT staffing firm Modis in Jacksonville, Fla.

The role isn't about sending out tweets and posting on Facebook all day, he clarifies. It's about leveraging technology to monitor online activity and interactions and to engage consumers.

Skills required

Given all that, the ideal candidate is someone who has a strong background in business strategy and marketing with project management and business intelligence experience mixed in -- and a technical background, with skills in HTML and Web rendering, Ripaldi says.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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