Why Tesla electric cars aren't bricked by failing batteries

By Sam Jaffe, IDC Energy Industry Insights Community |  IT Management, electric cars, tesla

Another error on the part of the blogger is the claim that if the cars discharge fully, the battery packs will be damaged. This is blatantly false. The battery management system of the Tesla Roadster keeps the battery from being discharged to a damagingly low state of charge under normal driving conditions. It's true that a full discharge to zero percent state of charge can potentially be damaging to a battery. However the battery management system of the Roadster won't allow the car to reach that low level of charge.

There is a fundamental problem when any rechargeable battery is discharged and then left to sit for months. Any boat owner understands that that's why you plug in a trickle charger when the craft is put into storage. The same should be done for any electric vehicle. However, to imply that the Tesla Roadster has a fundamental design flaw because of the nature of electrochemistry is like saying that Chrysler has a fundamental design flaw because its engines will be damaged if you drain all the oil out and then drive cross-country.

The blogger in question is, unfortunately, not a single voice in the wilderness. He's part of a widespread trend throughout some parts of the blogosphere and some parts of traditional media to politicize and demonize the electric vehicle. This trend has in turn damaged the general reputation of the automakers taking risks in building and selling these vehicles. This isn't the only problem that electric vehicles have today (overpricing and bad choreography have done their damage too). But there's an antidote for this type of misinformation: confronting it with facts.


Originally published on IDC Energy Industry Insights Community |  Click here to read the original story.
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