Starbucks CIO leaves coffee giant for Best Buy

By , Network World |  IT Management, CIO role

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College athlete, avid gamer and MBA graduate Stephen Gillett is leaving Starbucks to head up Best Buy's digital and global business services division. The 36-year-old former Starbucks CIO will start his new role at Best Buy effective March 14.

"I am very excited and pleased to be joining Best Buy. Life-long customer and thrilled to be a part of the team," Gillett tweeted this morning.

Gillett, whose official title is executive vice president and president, Best Buy digital and global business services, will report to company CEO Brian Dunn.

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"Stephen has that rare combination of business leadership skills, retail transformation experience, and digital and technological acumen -- he is uniquely positioned to make an immediate difference at Best Buy," Dunn said in a statement.

In his newly created position, Gillett will lead the company's e-commerce businesses, IT, and global shared services divisions. He's charged with speeding the growth of Best Buy by improving the company's global digital strategy, digital marketing, entertainment offerings, multi-channel capabilities and business development.

Before joining Best Buy, Gillett was CIO and executive vice president of digital ventures at Starbucks. In that role he earned a number of industry accolades. He was named to Fortune's "Executive Dream Team" as one of only two CIOs among the 25 executives recognized in 2011. Fortune also included him in its "40 Under 40" list last year, and he received the Aspen Institute Henry Crown Fellowship in 2010.


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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