How to design a successful RACI project plan

By Bob Kantor, CIO |  IT Management, project management

Informed: People or stakeholders who need to be kept "in the picture." They need updates on progress or decisions, but they do not need to be formally consulted, nor do they contribute directly to the task or decision.

The simple process for creating a RACI model includes the following six steps:

1. Identify all the tasks involved in delivering the project and list them on the left-hand side of the chart in completion order. For IT projects, this is most effectively addressed by incorporating the PLC steps and deliverables. (This is illustrated in the detailed example below, after the simplified version immediately below.)

2. Identify all the project stakeholders and list them along the top of the chart.

3. Complete the cells of the model identifying who has responsibility, accountability and who will be consulted and informed for each task.

4. Ensure every task has at least one stakeholder Responsible for it.

5. No tasks should have more than one stakeholder Accountable. Resolve any conflicts where there is more than one for a particular task.

6. Share, discuss and agree the RACI model with your stakeholders at the start of the project. This includes resolving any conflicts or ambiguities.

Resolving conflicts and ambiguities involves looking across each row and up and down each column for the following:

Analysis for each stakeholder:

Are there too many R's: Does one stakeholder have too much of the project assigned to them?

No empty cells: Does the stakeholder need to be involved in so many of the activities? Can Responsible be changed to Consulted, or Consulted changed to Informed? I.e., are there too many "cooks in this kitchen" to keep things moving? (And if so, what does that say about the culture within which this project is being managed?)

Buy-in: Does each stakeholder totally agree with the role that they are specified to play in this version of the model? When such agreement is achieved, that should be included in the project's charter and documentation.

Analysis for each PLC step or deliverable:

No R's: Who is doing the work in this step and getting things done? Whose role is it to take the initiative?

Too many R's: Is this another sign of too many "cooks in this kitchen" to keep things moving?

No A's: Who is Accountable? There must be one 'A' for every step of the PLC. One stakeholder must be Accountable for the thing happening -- "the buck stops" with this person.


Originally published on CIO |  Click here to read the original story.
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