Gaming's 15 funniest, most unfair, and memorable exploits

Exploits. Sometimes, they break games in your favor, allowing you access to powers, abilities, and cheap ways to accomplish difficult tasks that a game’s developers didn’t intend for you to have (and a game’s testers somehow overlooked). But these exploits can sometimes turn the tables against your peaceful adventures--especially in massively multiplayer games like World of Warcraft or EVE Online, where game-breaking bugs can give your peers untold advantage over your hapless, plays-by-the-rules self.

By David Murphy, PCWorld |  call of duty, gaming

5. Battlefield 3--Repairing for Massive XP

This one was fun. Upon the game’s release, players discovered that they could gain an absurd amount of experience in every multiplayer match by having friendly engineers shoot their own EOD bots. The player would then repair the bots; the engineers would keep shooting. Next match? Switch. End result? Massive leveling up for everyone.

6. FIFA 12--Goalie Defense

Bad at a little footsie? An easy exploit for EA Sports’ FIFA Soccer 12 allowed players to replace their meager soccer skills with AI awesomeness just by controlling their team’s goalkeeper at all times. The computer would take over for everyone else on the pitch--a trick that didn’t fare very well against experienced soccer veterans, but could certainly give amateur stars a bit of a match.

7. EVE Online--Trifecta

Which exploit is worse? The one that allowed enemy players to avoid appearing in local chat channels (which would alert nearby players of their presence), giving them a competitive advantage in sneak attack-style combat? The player-owned-stations exploit that allowed corporations to obtain high-end materials for free (and jack the game’s economy full of trillions of ISK that shouldn’t have been there?) Or how about the exploit that allowed ships to blast targets with short-range weaponry from an absurd distance away?

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