Mayer could pull off 'epic turnaround' at Yahoo

What the ex-Google exec must do in her first days as CEO

By , Computerworld |  IT Management, Yahoo

She also was a public face for Google, giving interviews and speaking to enthusiastic crowds at Google conferences and industry events.

Olds said Mayer's experience makes her the right person to take over control of Yahoo.

"I think that she's finally the right hire for Yahoo," he added. "She has the right pedigree and experience, plus she knows how to work in a large organization. Being Google's 20th employee, she also knows how to foster the corporate culture of an innovative and successful company. Bringing Yahoo back is a tall order, but I think she's the right person for the job."

By all expectations, it will be a big, messy job (http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9226898/Will_Yahoo_CEO_s_misstep_... ) .

Last September, Yahoo pushed out then-CEO Carol Bartz. In January, the company hired Scott Thompson, president of eBay's PayPal division, as its CEO. Five months later, Thompson was out amid a public scandal surrounding the inaccurate reporting of his academic credentials. For the second time in eight months, the company was, not only in an embarrassing spot, but was without a CEO.

If that was all Mayer has to contend with, that would be a challenge. However, Yahoo has seen its share of industry troubles, as well.

The company started out as an Internet pioneer but slowly slid into the online background. Industry upstarts, like Google, Facebook and Twitter, have overshadowed Yahoo and it has lost user mindshare over the years.

Tuesday afternoon, Yahoo reported revenue for the second quarter of 2012 of $1.2 billion, essentially flat compared to the same quarter a year ago. Income for the period was $190 million, down $1 million from the same quarter of 2011.

"It's a bit of a train wreck," said Enderle. "But this could be an epic turnaround. Mayer is more qualified to run Google than [Google CEO Larry] Page is. She has better people skills and has the rounding needed by a CEO. You basically have the person who should be running Google running Yahoo. Pretty much anything can happen."


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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