To avoid Dutch Galaxy ban, Samsung says Android's multitouch software is not as good as Apple's

By stating that Apple's multitouch technology is better, Samsung wants to avoid a sales ban

By Loek Essers, IDG News Service |  IT Management, Android, Apple

Samsung has claimed that the way Android's multitouch software works is not as good as Apple's, in a bid to avoid a recall and ban on sales of its Android smartphones in a patent dispute with Apple in the Netherlands.

Apple said in the Court of the Hague on Friday that Samsung should be banned from selling Android Galaxy devices in the Netherlands because Samsung infringes on a multitouch patent called "touch event model". The patent describes technology that prevents smartphone users from pushing two buttons at the same time on the screen, such as the play and the delete button in a music application.

In addition to a sales ban, Apple wants the judge to order a recall of all Galaxy devices that run Android 2.3 and higher from Dutch distributors and resellers. A sales ban in the Netherlands could also have an E.U.-wide effect because Samsung's distribution center is located in the Netherlands.

Both iOS and Android devices can disable touch input in certain areas of the screen when an application developer deems it necessary to do so to avoid undesirable input. Apple developed a way to prevent unwanted touches by giving each "view," an element of the user interface, exclusivity. Android uses a similar system that is more hierarchical, and doesn't only apply to one "view," Samsung's lawyers said.

While Apple's technology is a "very nice invention," the technique used in Android differs from the iOS solution, argued Bas Berghuis van Woortman, one of Samsung's lawyers. Because the Android based method is more hierarchical the system is more complex and therefore harder for developers to use, he said.

In addition, Apple devices disallow touch input in sections of the screen on the OS level, while Android does that on the application level, he said. Both are reasons Samsung's Android devices do not infringe on the patent, he added.

Apple disagrees. "They suggest that they have a lesser solution, but that is simply not true," said Apple's lawyer Theo Blomme to judge Peter Blok, who presided over a team of three judges, in a response to Samsung's claim. The technique used in Android does solve a multiple input "conflict situation" and in that way the Android software essentially does the same as Apple's, he said.

It is also possible to assign exclusivity to one particular "view" in Android, and thus Samsung infringes on the patent, said Rutger Kleemans, Apple's other lawyer in the courtroom.

Both Samsung's and Apple's legal teams concentrated on how to interpret the specific wording in the patent document.

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