5 dysfunctional IT relationships -- and how to repair them

Sys admins are from Mars, developers are from Venus, and legal is from hell -- here's how to heal friction among IT factions

By , InfoWorld |  IT Management

In large technology departments, dysfunctional relationships breed like mushrooms in a dank basement. Your dev and ops teams are no longer on speaking terms, while your junior and senior developers can't seem to agree on anything. IT and legal are constantly at each other's throats. Storage wonks are ready to declare war on the database admins, while sys admins seem to be on everyone's bad side.

Why can't they all just get along? In many cases it's the tension between conflicting demands on the same systems -- say, DBAs who complain about network performance but refuse to streamline their storage needs or business users who want to roll out new apps quickly, blissfully unaware of the effect they could have on other critical systems.

[ Also on InfoWorld: Beware the nine circles of IT hell, and learn steer clear of 20 common IT blunders and the 12 "best practices" IT should avoid at all costs. | For more IT management wisdom, sign up for Bob Lewis' Advice Line newsletter. ]

Fortunately there are solutions. We asked our geek relationship adviser, Crabby van Buren, to help find the common ground between these five warring factions. His advice follows.

Dysfunctional IT relationship No. 1: Storage admins vs. DBAsDear Crabby: Our database administrators have an insatiable appetite for storage. They never delete anything, they won't let us archive data or store it off-site, and they're constantly complaining the network is too slow. Meanwhile, the cost of storing all this data is killing our budget and making us storage engineers extremely unpopular with the CFO. What can we do? Underfunded & overcapacity


Originally published on InfoWorld |  Click here to read the original story.
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