5 dysfunctional IT relationships -- and how to repair them

Sys admins are from Mars, developers are from Venus, and legal is from hell -- here's how to heal friction among IT factions

By , InfoWorld |  IT Management

The mismatch between dev's need for speed and ops' need for control has led a lot of development teams to opt for public clouds, says Brett Adam, CTO at rPath, an enabler of PaaS (platform as a service) for enterprises and service providers. "While this provides the agility dev needs, it often does so as an end run around the ops team."  

"All of the velocity gains we've made on the dev side won't translate to business value until the same velocity is achieved on the ops side," says Adam. "Enterprises need both speed and control, enabling developers to rapidly provision what they need while also satisfying IT's need for governance. A private PaaS solution can align both of their interests."

Enterprises operating their own private clouds should consider a converged infrastructure, which could allow the dev team to spin up their own virtual machines as needed for building and testing code, says Damarillo. That would give them the ability to rapidly deploy in real-world conditions while still ensuring the safety and uptime ops demands.

Dysfunctional IT relationship No. 5: Sys admins vs. the worldLet me put this bluntly: The sys admins at our company are impossible. They're constantly nagging us to change our passwords (which are hard enough to remember as it is), haranguing us about software licenses, or insisting we follow some arcane procedure. But when we ask them to do something the business needs, the answer is almost always no. I'm tempted to bypass IT entirely and get what I need from the cloud, only I'm afraid the admins will change the passwords and lock us all out of the network. Frustrated & fearful

When you hold the keys to the kingdom, it's easy to create fiefdoms. For years, the admin's word was absolute. Users had to adhere to strict policies and procedures or get locked out. When admins spend all their time just getting systems to work properly, change is something to avoid at all costs -- in case something breaks and they have to fix it. Every so often, one of them will go rogue and cause real damage.


Originally published on InfoWorld |  Click here to read the original story.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

IT ManagementWhite Papers & Webcasts

Webcast On Demand

Enhance Your Virtualization Infrastructure With IBM and Vmware

Sponsor: VMware | IBM

White Paper

Why Projects Fail

White Paper

Why Projects Fail

See more White Papers | Webcasts

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question
randomness