Why Klout is doomed

Your Klout score may help you land a job or snag a better hotel room -- but not for long.

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You may not know this but I am a freakin’ expert on cigars. If it’s rolled up in dried tobacco leaves and smuggled in from Cuba in diplomatic pouches, I am your guy.

This must be true, because I read it on my Klout profile.

The world has gone a little Klout crazy, lately. There have been several recent stories about how Klout scores are now one of the things employers look at before hiring someone, especially for positions in sales and marketing. Want a job at Salesforce.com? You’ll need a score north of 35.

You can use a high Klout score to get discounts on concert tickets, access to VIP lounges at airports, or a nicer room at the Palms Casino Resort in Las Vegas.

Klout scores are a gumbo made mainly from how many friends/followers you have on the major social networks (though it seems to lean hardest on Twitter), how often you tweet or update your status, and how frequently other people repeat what you say. It’s an algorithm, but I can’t imagine it’s a very sophisticated algorithm.

Wanna know what else Klout scores are? Total b***s**t.

For the record, my Klout score is now 63. I’m told that’s a respectable score, but it’s as meaningless a number as I can think of. It was only 49 last April when I wrote this post about Klouchebags. The reason it climbed is most likely because I’ve started using Twitter a lot more over the past couple of months. Gee, I feel so much more influential now.

So I don’t really pay much attention to Klout. But today I received a tweet from Bev Robb, someone I know only via Twitter. She wrote:

I noticed that U R knowledgable in cigars over at Klout, so I 1 upped U ;)”

Cigars? Me? Really? But sure enough, Klout seems to consider me a highly regarded expert on Robusto Cubanos.

 

Also for the record, the last time I attempted to smoke a cigar was during the first Reagan administration. I still remember it, not at all fondly.

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