Five reasons to try the new Razor-qt Linux desktop

Particularly on older hardware, this lightweight contender can offer a speedy alternative.

By Katherine Noyes, PC World |  Hardware, Linux, Razor-qt

Razor-qt and KDE may both be based on Qt, but one big difference that sets Razor-qt apart is that it is so lightweight, and can work well with lower-powered machines. Included in the software are a desktop and panel, an application launcher, a settings center, and session components, but it's up to the user to decide which of those they want to use.

3. A raft of new plug-ins

4. New tools

A new appearance GUI for configuring themes, meanwhile, implements a new way of handling sizes and layouts, for example, and refreshing themes. Then, too, there's a new notifications daemon and a notepad widget now available on the desktop.

5. New bug fixes and translations

Last but not least, numerous bugs have been fixed and translations added in this new release, delivering new stability and accessibility to users around the globe.

Razor-qt 0.5.0 is now available as a free download from the project site, and packages for Linux distributions including Ubuntu, Fedora, and Mageia are available through their official repositories.

If you're tired of the dominant desktop choices out there--and particularly if you have older hardware--Razor-qt could be a nice option to test out.


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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