Getting requirements engineering right: 5 keys for success

By Brian Berenbach, ITworld |  IT Management, book, project management

This is part of a regular series that highlights new books and their authors. Also in this series: Michael Ogrinz on Mashups, J. Peter Bruzzese on Exchange Server 2007, Joel Scambray on exposing the hacker's advantage, and Scott Hogg on IPv6 security. (You can find all the installments in this series here.)


Software & Systems Requirements Engineering

Requirements engineering is a key part of the product or project lifecycle -- and often the most difficult part. As Joe Sutter, the father of the Boeing 747, said in an interview with Air and Space magazine: "At the start of a program, asking questions is the most important part of the process. If you get [the customer's] requirements wrong, then you don't have a successful product." It is a challenging field.

About the book Software & Systems Requirements Engineering: In Practice is intended to appeal to a wide range of IT professionals. Best practices are described for requirements elicitation, business modeling, requirements management and the relationship between requirements and testing. The appendix includes information on requirements databases and their use.

We also talk about things in this book that are not commonly discussed in RE primers. For example, we discuss the management of large numbers of requirements on industrial projects, the practical application of RE techniques to handling architectural requirements, and we offer some tips for rapid prototyping.

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