Are scripting languages the wave of the future?

ITworld.com |  Development

When Robert Martin talks, programmers listen.

XP! Patterns! UML! Java! C++! OOD! SE! For most of the last 30 years, Martin has worked full time at the center of modern programming practice. His specialties and concerns have been exactly those of the silent majority of professional developers: How do I use STL? Should our team practice extreme programming? Which analysis methodology is effective?
Throughout his career, Bob has been a working programmer himself, informing his "outreach" as an author, editor, publisher, manager, entrepreneur, pundit, and trainer.

Last week, Martin talked to ITworld.com's Cameron Laird and readers in the ITworld.com Interviews forum about the programming languages of the coming decade and other topics. Here's an excerpt:

ITworld.com: Does language make a difference? Your emphasis on code hygiene and expressiveness is welcome. Why, then, do we spend so much time working in C and C++? If an organization comes to you with a coherent set of requirements, and says it's willing to trust you about what language will help it best meet its goals, what advice are you likely to give?

Robert Martin: Language certainly makes a difference; but any language can be written well.

I don't mind C or C++. There are certainly cases where those are the best languages for the job. DSP code, if not written in assembler, is probably best written in C. Hard embedded realtime apps are well done in C++. And many Web apps or MIS/IT apps are nicely done in Java.

However, I think there is a trend in language that will become more and more evident as the decade progresses. I think we are seeing an end to the emphasis on statically typed (type-safe) languages like C++, Java, Eiffel, Pascal, and Ada. These languages force you to declare the types of variables before you can use them.

As this decade progresses I expect to see an ever increasing use of dynamically typed languages, such as Python, Ruby, and even Smalltalk. These languages are often referred to as "scripting languages." I think this is a gross injustice. It is these languages, and languages of their kind, that will be mainstream industrial languages in the coming years.

Why do I think this? Because these languages are much easier to refactor. What's more, they have virtually zero compile time.

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