Who'da thunk: WikiLeaks sex charges all fluffed up

'Sex crimes' actually meant 'didn't use a condom'

By  

The arrest alert Interpol put out about WikiLeaks' founder Julian Assange for "sex crimes" referred not to rape or molestation, but to a Swedish law against consensual sex without a condom.

Not only that, prosecutors and Interpol knew that before they issued the sexual-predator-sounding Red Notice story about the "sex crimes" had already been published -- in August -- and largely dismissed by both prosecutors and Interpol. They were revived when U.S. and other Western governments were looking for ways to add pressure to Assange.

From Newsweek, Aug. 25:

<blockquote>A Swedish lawyer representing two women whose allegations triggered a sexual-misconduct investigation of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has given [Newsweek column] Declassified the first on-the-record confirmation of the allegations that led to the issuance—and then rapid cancellation—of a warrant on a rape charge and to a parallel investigation into alleged “molestation."

...

Borgstrom said that specific details about the allegations had not yet appeared in Swedish media. But he acknowledged that the principal concern the women had about Assange’s behavior—which they reported to police in person—related to his lack of interest in using condoms and his refusal to undergo testing, at the women’s request, for sexually transmitted disease. </blockquote>

Kevin Fogarty writes about enterprise IT for ITworld. Follow him on Twitter @KevinFogarty.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question
randomness