FCC creates a monster, gives it control of the Internet

Carriers can strangle competitors, charge others through the nose

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The FCC's new framework has nothing to do with technology, or preserving the character or continued technological development of the Internet. It has nothing to do with law or fairness or the consistent application of rules for the better governance of a shared resource.

It has everything to do with the right of carriers to restrict competition and maximize their own profit at the expense of their own customers.

Even Republicans are disgusted at intensity of the carriers' greed and lust for power.

It puts the Internet providers in the position of Wall Street banks that made billions during the housing bubble by selling worthless securities to investors and offered irresistible, unpayable loans to people who couldn't afford them.

It is the codification in FCC policy that the Internet is not only not a shared space or utility meant to benefit everyone, but private property managed for the benefit and profit of the very few who own some of its pieces.

Economically it's a pyramid scheme.

Morally it's that fairytale about the goats crossing the bridge with the troll waiting underneath to eat them. Except, instead of being the big goat that comes along at the end to knock the troll back into its place, the FCC is sitting on the bank yelling; "Hope you're hungry, here comes another one."

Nice work.

Kevin Fogarty writes about enterprise IT for ITworld. Follow him on Twitter @KevinFogarty.

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