Apple loses 'app store' trademark, designs U.S. trademark law out of Macs, iPhones

After loss of 'app store' trademark Apple plans to kill trademarks like it did the floppy disk

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Guess what? You can say "app store" again!

Yesterday a California court told Apple that the way it used the term "App Store" is not "renowned" or "prominent" enough to consider it a trademark well established enough to prevent other companies from using it.

Apple sued Amazon last March asking for damages and an injunction to keep the world's largest online store from using the term "Appstore" for a store that sells apps because, obviously, apple had already used those words.

It was turned down by the judge, who said the words app and store even combined and capitalized and printed near an Apple logo, are still generically simple descriptive terms just like "liquor" and "store, " "groceries" and "store" or "ego" and "massive, pretentious."

Obviously the judge was not aware that any idea created, developed or categorized as "Mine!" by a scream and quick-toddler grab from Steve Jobs is automatically both prominent and renowned enough to qualify as a trademark, whether a judge agrees or not.

Apple will reportedly respond within months by eliminating support in the MacOS for the Lanham Act – the federal law that provides the platform on which U.S. trademark law is built, and relevant portions of the U.S. Constitution.

These "laws" are relics of the analog age that are technically outdated, weak from a design perspective and often lacking in support for Apple itself, according to a source from Apple we can't identify because his ego couldn't fit through the door of the coffee shop where we met, so he had to call on his iPhone.

By eliminating support within the MacOS and iOS for the applicabl U.S. laws, Apple will make them irrelevant to the computing public at large and cause them to gently, naturally reach the end of their useful life, the source said.

"Constitutional Law had its place in history, especially when Microsoft owned the whole IT industry and had to keep Apple in business – no matter how badly Apple did financially or technically -- to avoid looking even more like a monopoly," the source said. "Now that the real CEO is back in place, Microsoft is sinking under its own weight and Apple is making great strides in convincing people "computers" don't have to do much more than touch up digital photos and browse the Web, we can dispense with all that.

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