Find My Mac both useful and frustrating for law enforcement

The service is often not accurate enough to get someone's stolen device back, Dutch police said

By Loek Essers, IDG News Service |  Legal

Find My Mac can be used to show the location of a stolen Mac, but the service often does not provide enough evidence to obtain a search warrant and get the stolen device back to its rightful owner, the Dutch police said on Monday.

Find My Mac is a free service for Apple users that helps them to approximate the location of a missing device on a map using iCloud. The same service is also available for missing iPhones, iPads and iPod touch devices. Apple's finding services can also be used to play a sound, display a message, remotely lock a device or erase all the data on it.

The devices broadcast their location if they are connected to the Internet via a mobile or Wi-Fi network. If a Mac is connected to the Internet only by an Ethernet cable, Find My Mac will not be able to locate the device, according to Apple.

But even if a stolen Mac can be located, this information is not always very useful to law enforcement.

Last Friday night, an iMac got stolen together with laptops and peripheral equipment from Rotterdam-based Isolease, said Corine van den Houten, founder of the company, on Monday. Isolease is a consulting service specializing in regulations and standards compliance.

She used Find My Mac to see if she could track down her computer and a dot appeared on a map locating the device in one of the western suburbs of Amsterdam, and she informed the police. "I told them it was pretty clear where my Mac was," she said, adding that as far as she was concerned that meant that her stuff was basically for grabs. However, the police told her they couldn't do anything for her based on that information.

"If the location was given with an address and house number we could probably get a warrant to search the house," Patricia Wessels, spokeswoman for the Rotterdam-Rijnmond police said. Find My Mac shows the approximate location, and while the dot on the map provides a nice clue, it is not precise enough, especially in densely populated areas, Wessels said.

"We are not allowed to just start searching 300 homes," said Wessels, who added that searching someone's home is a far-reaching measure to take. In this case Van den Houten's iMac appears to be in an apartment building, which makes it more difficult to determine where the device actually is, said Wessels.

"We know that this is frustrating, especially for the owner," but there are rules attached to police investigations, Wessels said. However, the police will certainly use the Find My Mac information in their ongoing investigation, she added.

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