CTIA keynoters tout how wireless fills social needs

Wireless communications leapfrogging wired throughout the Third World

By Computerworld staff, Computerworld |  Mobile & Wireless, CTIA

LAS VEGAS -- The wireless phone is becoming a great equalizer between the haves and have-nots around the world, according to multiple keynote speakers at the CTIA Wireless conference here this week.

Wireless industry pioneer John Stanton provided his audience of the most dramatic examples of the spread of wireless technology when he showed a video that described how cell phones helped save lives in the aftermath of the Jan. 12 Haitian earthquake .

Stanton is the chairman of Trilogy International Partners, owner of Voila, one of three mobile operators in Haiti. He traces his wireless roots to mobile innovator McCaw Cellular in the 1980s.

In the video, one relief worker said that while some military-grade communications had failed in the earthquake, his ordinary cell service continued operating. Stanton said he learned of at least 100 people trapped in earthquake rubble who used cell phones to deliver voice and text messages telling rescuers where they were.

In an interview, Stanton said the enduring value cell phones in poorer countries like Haiti, where landlines are limited, is their use for banking and e-commerce transactions as well as for emergency communications.

Some Haitian workers today use cell phones as mobile wallets -- getting paid via mobile credits that are later converted to cash. Thousands of Haitians also offer up their mobile phones to others to make microcalls for a fee, Stanton said.

"In America, we grew up with the notion of wired telecommunications, but wireless has a 21st century role," Stanton said. "In Third World countries, [wireless] is really leapfrogging the wired platform. "

Haiti, Stanton believes, can be the world's first "copper-free" country-- not needing to install the copper wires used in traditional wired telecommunications. Instead, the country would primarily use a first rate telecom infrastructure based entirely on wireless technology.

Other CTIA keynoters also showed examples of how mobile technologies are used worldwide.

Biz Stone, co-founder of Twitter, offered who several examples of Twitter has been used in various countries to organize street protests.

"It's striking, we had no idea Twitter would become so widely used," he said. "Often protests are organized over Twitter. Letting people communicate openly can have a profound influence ... you have a sense of yourself as a global citizen."


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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