Mobile devices have not supplanted laptops, yet

Survey showing 90% access Web via mobile is skewed, but not completely wrong

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Intel's experience is pretty telling, though. The company's internal IT people were surprised to find there were employees who were constantly mobile, but almost never left the campus. They just moved from conference room to business-unit suite to work with different groups and almost never came back to their offices.

They were shocked that employees would spend their own money on phones that support the right mobile components to be able to connect to the corporate network securely, if IT would just tell them what those requirements were.

Employees were surprised to find IT doing more than saying 'No' and going out of its way to make user-classifications more flexible to make getting the right technology simpler, and offering more convenient ways to do things they were already doing using methods they'd kludged up themselves.

IT and end users seem to be working together a lot more smoothly, and not just because they get to play with all the best new technology.

No one would admit whether they actually had these guys delivering the mail or if they'd ever been able to make that robot's emotional state more stable. Some secrets they keep to themselves.

So if you were going off to Thanksgiving thinking you and your company were both way behind the rest of the country in using outmoded laptops or desktops instead of cool mobile stuff to access the Web more often, don't worry. We haven't reached the tipping point yet. Morgan Stanley predicted in April it would happen in 2015.

It looks like the market is moving faster than that, though, and from IT's perspective, balance is already starting to shift. If you don't start to adjust pretty quickly, it might upend you as well as the market.

Kevin Fogarty writes about enterprise IT for ITworld. Follow him on Twitter @KevinFogarty.

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