What do you use to keep your WiFi secure?

Use what you set up for your end users? Or something more?

By  

There are plenty of studies and plenty of analyses showing how vulnerable consumers and corporate end users are to sniffers, phishing, password recording or simple eavesdropping connecting wirelessly, especially using WiFi, in public places.

IT people are generally considered to know better than to get a new cell phone and not change the default password – as did many of the celebrities whose sexting and naked photos are alleged to have been swiped recently.

Standard corporate practice seems to be to install a VPN client (usually Cisco's) that encrypts traffic back to a remote-access server that passes you through to some semblance of the resources you access when you're connected directly.

You (and your users) might not want to use the same connection for your personal browsing, emailing or resume distribution, however.

Another option is necessary, preferably one that's free or very low cost.

Former PCWorld usability and PC Annoyances guru Steve Bass recommends a couple of VPN options that are free or cheap, and relatively effective.

HotSpotShield is free, but shows you ads and replaces some error pages and search pages with its advertisers, most annoyingly Ask.com. proXPN,HMAPro and StrongVPN get OK reviews, though reactions vary with each of them.

There are dozens of other VPNs, free and paid, including the TOR/Onion network that offer a range of SSL and PPTP connections, and a range of encryption-key lengths. They vary widely on cost, efficacy, ease of use and the speed of their connections, however.

There is some good discussion of a few at BlackHatWorld.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Mobile & WirelessWhite Papers & Webcasts

See more White Papers | Webcasts

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question
randomness