Sprint makes CTIA splash with 3D smartphone, Evo tablet

By , Network World |  Mobile & Wireless, CTIA, smartphones

Sprint may have groaned after rival carrier AT&T announced plans earlier this week to gobble up T-Mobile, but that didn't stop the carrier from debuting two splashy wireless devices at CTIA Tuesday.

One year after Sprint scored a hit with the Evo 4G, its first-ever WiMAX-based phone, the carrier has come back with two new Evo-branded devices: a tablet and a "glasses-free" 3D phone that runs on 4G wireless networks.

Here's a breakdown of the new devices:

HTC Evo View 4G

What it is: A tablet with connectivity to Wi-Fi, EV-DO Rev. A and WiMAX networks.

Why you should care: While the initial iPad faced some criticism that it was essentially just a large version of the iPhone, this was actually one of the secrets to its success since it took the ease of use that was so popular with the iPhone and applied it to a tablet form factor. Sprint and HTC are basically doing the same thing with the Evo View 4G by promising to "bring the best of the HTC Evo experience into a tablet design." In other words, customers who have been pleased with their Evo 4G phones should find the Evo View to be equally accessible.

TABLET TUMBLE: iPad 2 vs. Motorola Xoom

Spec check: Unfortunately, the Evo View currently runs on Android 2.3 ("Gingerbread"), which is optimized for smartphones rather than tablets. Sprint told CNET that it will push out the tablet-centric Android 3.0 ("Honeycomb") to the Evo View as soon as it can. That issue aside, the Evo View boasts some impressive specs, including a 1.5GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon processor, 32GB of internal memory and HTC Scribe Technology that lets users take advantage of "enhanced voice-synchronized note taking with the HTC Scribe digital pen to capture the audio of a meeting at the same time as written notes." The tablet's 7-inch screen is smaller than those on the iPad and Motorola Xoom, but it still has a strong resolution (1024x600 pixels).

HTC Evo 3D

What it is: A smartphone that purports to offer users "a glasses-free 3D experience."


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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