Nine iPad 2 folio-style cases

By Jason Snell, Macworld |  Mobile & Wireless

There's a lot to like about these cases, especially if you like leather folios. The iPad itself is framed by leather, a look that I don't really like—I'd rather see as much of the iPad's glass front as possible—but is quite common in folio cases. To insert the iPad, you remove a Velcro fastener from behind the left side of the leather frame and slide in the tablet. The leather frame keeps all ports and buttons accessible, including the iPad's rear camera via a circular cut-out.

Each of the Cygnett folios includes the requisite cover magnets to support the iPad 2 sleep/wake feature, so the device turns on when you open the front cover. The cover also features a separate magnetic clasp, so the front cover remains securely closed when you're not using the iPad. The front cover is actually attached in the middle of the back of the case, where a hinge lets the cover fold out into a triangular configuration that props up the main part of the case; three strips on the inside of the cover provide for three different video-viewing angles.

If you're looking for a leather, business-style case—or one with a bit of panache, in the case of the Lavish Earth and Glam versions—the Cygnett iPad 2 case delivers.

Scosche Folio Case for iPad 2

Scosche's $45 Folio P2 Folio Case for iPad 2 ( Macworld rated 3 out of 5 mice ), available in Black Leather Texture, White Leather Texture, Black Carbon Fiber Texture, and White Carbon Fiber Texture, provides protection for your iPad 2 without adding much weight or thickness. Its faux-leather or carbon-fiber exterior is classy, and and the interior is lined with soft fabric. You fasten the iPad into the case by pushing it into six hooks that hold the iPad tightly without obscuring any of the front glass or any ports, cameras, or buttons.

Using the case as a landscape-orientation video-viewing stand is easy too, courtesy of four grooves on the inside front cover. You snap the iPad out of the two leftmost mounting hooks, and then position the left edge of the iPad in one of these grooves. You can also flip the cover around to the back to create a typing stand.

The Folio P2 has a clever design and and attractive look, but it fails the magnet test: the case's cover won't automatically wake up your iPad when you open the front cover and put it to sleep when you close the cover. Without this glaring omission, Schosche's case would be an excellent lightweight option.

Hard Candy Cases Convertible iPad 2 Case


Originally published on Macworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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