Remind everyone you know: malware kills computers, smartphones are computers

A ridiculously high percentage of smartphone users don't even know the could get a virus

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Without thinking about it too much, an astonishing number of Mac users just accepted the rumor that had been circulating among smugly like-minded people that Apple products were too secure to be infected by viruses or hacked directly.

Now that Macs are closer to 10 percent of new machines sold, the pool of victims is a lot bigger and so is the list of viruses designed for Macs.

Smartphones are no different, because they're not actually phones.

Smartphones are tiny computers that are also able to make calls across the same cellular-network data connections they use to download weather reports and compare Angry Bird scores.

Android is a bigger risk, according to a recent report from Symantec, largely because controls on Android apps are so thin that Google has to keep having to pull malware from its apps market.

The Android ecosystem is "a malware cesspool" because users purposely circumvent the security in Android to install new apps, and the Android apps market is largely unfiltered by Google, according to InfoWorld's Galen Gruman.

Apple's overly structured, primly paternalistic Apps Store is more secure because malware is often filtered out along with most of the interesting content.

iPhones, iPads and even iTouch and iPods are vulnerable even so, though there are fewer exploits and code aimed at them specifically because they are a slightly harder target.

All of which is freaking obvious.

Except 63 percent of smartphone users responding to a survey published by mobile security company BullGuard this month said specifically that their phones didn't need security or that the risk never crossed their minds.

During the last six months the number of malware reports involving smartphones rose 250 percent.

In six months.

In April a survey published by youth-government-education organization YouGov showed 14 percent of users thought security was built in, 31 percent thought there was no risk and 81 percent said they had no anti-virus capabilities on their phones at all.

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