Sony: Google's Motorola move good for other Android smartphone makers

Marketing exec emphasizes importance of 'protecting Android ecosystem' from patent claims

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So it's been a couple of weeks now since Google announced it was buying Android smartphone manufacturer Motorola Mobility for $12.5 billion, and we've been waiting for the other Android manufacturers -- who presumably now will be competing directly with Google -- to react.

And I mean a real reaction, not the phony, given-while-stunned comments of approval coerced from them by Google when the search giant shocked the mobile world in mid-August.

Well, Sony Ericsson marketing executive Nikolaus Scheurer just spoke to Reuters about Google's Motorola Mobility move, and, at least for now, Sony doesn't feel threatened by the deal.

From Reuters:

"Google confirmed that this is not making Google a hardware manufacturer. I assume the global marketshare of Motorola is somewhere around 15 percent in Android. I think everybody would agree that it does not really make sense to jeopardize 85 percent of your business," Scheurer said.

Did anyone else sense a little bit of a dig in that statement?

Still, Scheurer makes a point. Google has a good thing going with the more than three dozen other Android smartphone manufacturers. Even HP probably wouldn't jeopardize 85% of its business with some hasty, fly-by-night decision!

Beyond that, it's likely that the other Android makers are focused much less on competing with Motorola and its big 15% market share and more on the legal cover Motorola Mobility's many mobile and wireless patents bring to Android. Scheurer makes no secret of this, telling Reuters, "It is important for us to protect the Android ecosystem."

That's Sony's take for the moment, anyway. It's not likely the other 37 or so Android makers fully share that sentiment. Already there are rumors that Samsung may be interested in buying Palm's webOS business from HP as a hedge against Googlerola. And ITworld has heard that, to sweeten the deal, HP is even willing to throw in its PC division at no extra cost!

OK, I made up that last part about the PC unit. For the sake HP's shareholders, let's hope no one at HP runs with it.

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