Why we need Windows 8 tablets

By Melissa J. Perenson, PC World |  Networking, Microsoft, tablets

Interoperability: It's a big word that describes an even bigger problem--namely, that of the compatibility of your apps and data between different devices. And while the mobile worlds of Google's Android and Apple's iOS have come a long way, nothing compares to the complete end-to-end compatibility offered by a Windows computer. The issues that a Windows 8 tablet could address are the twin troubles of file handling and app compatibility--two things that remain troublesome thorns in the sides of both Android and iOS.

The File Conundrum

These past months I've spent using the myriad of Google's Android Honeycomb tablets and Apple's iOS-based iPad 2 have been an eye-opener. The two platforms inherently work very differently: Apple has its alternately maligned and beloved "walled garden" approach, while Google is more open, but wracked by inconsistencies, wherein one tablet supports certain file types and another doesn't, and it's not clear to a user why one does and the other doesn't.

(The answer, simply, is that some tablet makers add file-type support on their own, to support basics like WMV, AVI, and PDF that Google doesn't natively support. But this support is generally through the inclusion of separate software added to Android's base install, and the implementation of file support doesn't appear fundamentally any different from stock Google...which makes it hard to be clear that this is a differentiation from one tablet to the next.)

At least Android provides a file system users can access--even if it's a mess with haphazard folder nomenclature and requires third-party software to tap into it. Google admits it never intended for Android's file system to be accessed and used as Windows Explorer is, but the reality is that tablet makers and file manager app developers are embracing the fact that this feature exists in Android. It's nowhere in iOS; there, you have to rely on a developer to provide support for iOS's "Open in" option, something I've seen inconsistently implemented. And even then, file handling gets kludgy and awkward, a sad reality given the overall simple elegance of Apple's platform. Files get locked into the app you're using, and need to be associated with that app--a counterintuitive experience that is opposite what consumers are used to in the desktop universe so many of us rely on.

It's About Files...and About Apps

In reality, for most of us, a Windows computer is already part of our lives. And in going between a laptop or desktop and an iOS device or an Android device, one can run into all sorts of issues and incompatibilities. Not to mention the specific issue of app compatibility.


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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