Managing mobile tech is the gift that keeps on giving IT headaches

Any tech that changes that fast and changes things that much is a problem too big for one solution

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IT has been struggling with waves of user rebellion, increasing support costs, chaotic growth in the number and type of devices it has to support, data that leaves the data center to go live in the cloud, users who do the same – a whole menagerie of troublesome, expensive changes many IT veterans are told they have to accommodate whether they agree with the changes or not.

Analysts call it consumerization; many in IT call it chaos.

InfoWorld has finally figured out who to blame.

Not the end users, believe it or not.

Not the overly ambitious CIO with the background in business and body of technical knowledge barely deep make sure TCP/IP is spelled correctly without resorting to spell check.

It is the fault of the business itself. And time. And progress.

The same rule that ensures data-center servers get smaller, cheaper and more powerful every six- to 18 months does the same with end-user devices.

Smaller, more powerful, more able to be used by innovative employees to accomplish things they couldn't otherwise.

Cheap and simple enough for other employees to follow the lead of the first one, and to justify the change to departmental, then regional, then divisional managers.

Finally business-unit managers making cyclic changes in headcount, workflow, process and budgets glom onto the new tech to help make those changes, too.

Afterward, those "rogue" devices aren't rogue any more. Those toys – and the SaaS apps and cloud services managers at various levels have also bought on credit cards because it's easier to do something themselves than to ask IT to do it – are now an integral part of the business process.

IT can no longer deny them because IT isn't there to thwart business processes; IT exists to make business processes cheaper and easier. Removing devices or barring outside services because IT doesn't like them is like fixing a flat tire by ignoring the spare tire, stripping off the flat one, and driving away on the rim.

It will draw a lot of attention to your decision; it will not help passengers in the car get where they're going.

InfoWorld covers these issues and more in 10 Hard Truths IT has to Accept.

Photo Credit: 

Reuters

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