Cell carriers launch anti-theft effort they could have started in 1996

Even after agreeing, carriers delay start for six months, sell more replacement phones in meantime

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"It is hard to find a reason why they haven’t done it before," Newman told the IDG News Service.

Surely it couldn't be because customers who've had a phone stolen usually have to buy a new one from their carrier, often at retail cost rather than the far-lower subsidized cost they offer when customers sign up for two-year contract commitments.

Even cell phone carriers – most of whom have well earned reputations for gouging customers, charging usurious prices for data and text, and who spent most of the net-neutrality debate last year complaining they were about to go out of business because of the demands of all their brand-new smartphone customers – even cell-phone carriers couldn't be so crass, manipulative and greedy as to allow their customers to be robbed and do nothing about it because they make money selling replacement hardware to victims?

Even cell carriers wouldn't do that, would they?

Read more of Kevin Fogarty's CoreIT blog and follow the latest IT news at ITworld. Follow Kevin on Twitter at @KevinFogarty. For the latest IT news, analysis and how-tos, follow ITworld on Twitter and Facebook.

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