Why will IT STILL not support BYOD?

Under-supporting end users in cloud and mobile is a good way to get IT a permanent furlough

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IT – which earned the satiric Dilbertian sobriquet "preventer of information services," even if many won't admit it – has to start seeing the technology for which it is responsible the way the end users do: as tools to get a job done, not ends in themselves.

How to use BYOD to drastically reduce IT's workload: Keep ignoring it

The Consumerization of IT has become so undeniable a trend it has earned its own pointless and slightly provocative-sounding acronym (CoIT). It has made Apple a success, introduced SaaS and cloud into the enterprise, given business units far more control over their own work product than ever before and reputedly scared the hell out of CIOs who suddenly realized the peasants were not only revolting, they were starting a rebellion as well.

Guess what? They don't have to. If you're in IT, there is a small chance you're one of the savvy types popular with end users who already realize that users run the company you work for; they are the company you work for. Their work is the end product of all the company's effort, the thing it offers to customers and for which customers are willing to give money in exchange.

Unless you work at a computer-industry vendor company, customers do not come to you for IT services.

End users come to you, not for IT services, but to ask you to help them get their work done.

Lots of studies show end users are a lot more productive when they're able to pick tools that help do their jobs more effectively than those IT provides.

Mobile tech, especially, tends to add hours and productivity because it comes in to use when end users would otherwise be out of touch, or unable to connect to email, sales data or other sources of information that can help them accomplish something while they stand in line at Starbucks or during halftime at a kid's soccer game.

Those are extra hours, offered free to the corporation that you, as the unhelpful, uncommitted not-quite-supporter of BYOD are giving up (without telling the CEO) because you'd have to make inconvenient changes to pick what you have to admit is very low-hanging fruit.

Do BYOD anyway, even if you don't like it

So figure out how, within your own organizational structure and budget limitations, you can help them do that.

That goal used to be referred to as business-IT alignment. Now it's just "get on the stick and offer the help we need or we'll take back the stick and run you out of the company on it."

Surveys of senior-level IT managers show that a lot of them are worried cloud computing will turn into an outsourcing trend that will end up eliminating their jobs.

Photo Credit: 

Reuters

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