Productivity vs. cost: What you must consider before cutting the cord and mobilizing Your workforce

By Dave Berg, senior director of product management at Shunra Software, Network World |  Mobile & Wireless, enterprise mobility

This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.

As technology makes it possible for workers on the move to be connected to their files, data and clients at anytime from anywhere, there is a greater expectation for worker productivity. But unless you take into account issues such as mobile and Wi-Fi network performance, service provider data limits, stress of mobile devices on server infrastructure, differences in device hardware and software, and mobile security, you may have a "mobile" workforce, but one that is less productive and more expensive than an in-office workforce.

Say you are traveling on the Acela from your office in New York to a meeting in Washington, D.C. During the three-hour trip, you plan to use your iPad and the train's free Wi-Fi to watch a company-mandated training video. You then plan on using your laptop to download and fine-tune a large PowerPoint presentation needed for the meeting. This would be the definition of maximizing your productivity via mobile. But guess what? You can't do either of those tasks. Amtrak blocks streaming video on its Wi-Fi and restricts file downloads to 10MB.

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Annoyed, you connect your iPad to the Verizon network. Things are streaming very well over your 4G connection until you are suddenly handed off to 3G and the headache of buffering begins. You pull into Union Station frustrated at not accomplishing what you needed to get done.

This example demonstrates some of the network limitations you might encounter when mobilizing your workforce. You cannot control the conditions on public networks and if something goes wrong, you are at the mercy of that service provider.

To gain the full benefits of mobility, you need to anticipate where your mobile workforce will be located and their connectivity needs. If you expect your workers to be primarily in areas with spotty coverage or slow speeds, having them work via mobile might not make sense. A project manager working for an oil company will most likely have greater difficulty finding network conditions that meet his/her mobile working needs in the Texas Panhandle than will a commodities trader from New York working for a week at the Chicago Stock Exchange.


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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