iPhone 5 design, quality demands slows manufacturing

By , Network World |  Mobile & Wireless, Apple, iPhone 5

Gou's apparently brief public comments echo those of an unnamed Hon Hai executive quoted in a Journal blogpost by Lorraine Luk in October. "The iPhone 5 is the most difficult device that Foxconn has ever assembled. To make it light and thin, the design is very complicated," the executive was quoted as saying.

At least at that time, one issue was the propensity for the new phone's metal exterior to suffer scratches. "Hon Hai has recently implemented a new quality check procedure to reduce the chance of damages," Luk reported in her blogpost. "But [the executive] noted the iPhone 5 uses a new coating material that makes it more susceptible to scratching."

Almost at once pundits began speculating that the new iPhone's design was needlessly complex.

It's "so complicated that the company Apple and most of the consumer electronics world considers the best contract manufacturer on the planet can't figure out how to build it in a way that keeps up with demand while maintaining quality," complains Erica Ogg, writing at GigaOm. "It's worth wondering if perhaps Apple went overboard. At what point do we begin wondering what the guys in Apple's design team were thinking?"

Ogg speculates that iPhone designer Jonathan Ive may be to blame, or perhaps the late Steve Jobs. "CEO Tim Cook's background is supply-chain management and manufacturing, and it would be surprising for him to put the iPhone 5 on the company's most aggressive roll-out schedule ever if he didn't think they could meet those goals," she writes.

"But there could be other dynamics at work here: maybe Jony Ive, who leads the industrial design group, gets to have the iPhone design he wants and Cook figures out how to get it made in huge volumes. After all, as Jobs told his biographer, Jobs set it up before he left 'that there's no one at the company who can tell Ive what to do.'"

But it's not clear what Jobs' statement means in practice, since it would in effect put Ive in charge of the company, not Cook.

In his comments this week, Foxconn's Gou didn't go into details. He "declined to say which of the phone's design features has caused production issues and how long it will take for those issues to be solved," according to the Journal. "He also refused to comment if Hon Hai plans to outsource some of the iPhone orders to other makers, or to its Hong Kong-listed subsidiary Foxconn International Holdings Ltd., as some analysts suggested last week."

Apple sold 5 million iPhone 5 units in the first weekend of sales in September, but has not released any sales figures since then, or indicated when the three to four week delay might ease.


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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