Globalstar's plan for an extra Wi-Fi band draws fire

Wi-Fi and Bluetooth backers say the proposal might hurt performance, but Globalstar says it won't

By , IDG News Service |  Mobile & Wireless

A satellite operator's proposal to offer an extra channel of Wi-Fi might actually give average Wi-Fi and Bluetooth users less bandwidth, according to some industry groups that have commented on the plan in filings to the FCC.

The plan by Globalstar, proposed to the U.S. Federal Communications Commission in November, calls for opening up a restricted part of the Wi-Fi band for a fourth usable channel, called Channel 14. But Globalstar would control who could use that channel. It might offer access in a variety of ways, including its own Wi-Fi networks, carrier partnerships and device firmware downloads.

Monday was the deadline for filing comments to the FCC on Globalstar's plan, and the Wi-Fi Alliance, the Bluetooth Special Interest Group and other industry entities have voiced concerns about the proposal. They fear it effectively would let the company license spectrum that is defined as unlicensed.

Globalstar said the groups' concerns were unfounded. But the debate highlights the growing importance of Wi-Fi for home, office and service-provider networks. Wi-Fi has large amounts of spectrum allocated to it in both the 2.4GHz and the 5.8GHz bands, but even that capacity is often overwhelmed by demand in densely populated locations. Last week, FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski proposed adding 195MHz of additional spectrum to Wi-Fi in the U.S. by having unlicensed uses share the space with federal agencies.

Part of the 2.4GHz spectrum is available for Wi-Fi use under the IEEE 802.11 standard, but it is "lying fallow" in the U.S. because there aren't enough frequencies to provide another non-overlapping channel, Globalstar General Counsel and Vice President Barbee Ponder said. The very top of the unlicensed band, which is adjacent to Globalstar's satellite spectrum, is restricted from Wi-Fi use in order to protect that licensed band. In November, Globalstar asked the FCC to let it use that spectrum, first for special Wi-Fi networks and later, possibly, for a 4G LTE system.

Consumers with the additional Wi-Fi channel might get to use Wi-Fi in more places and get higher performance. Current Wi-Fi chips would be able to use that band with a firmware upgrade, Globalstar said. If it gets permission to use the spectrum, Globalstar at first wants to set up a TLPS (terrestrial low-power service) in schools and hospitals, using Wi-Fi gear with the extra channel.

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