How BlackBerry recreated the mobile user experience with Z10

By , Network World |  Mobile & Wireless, BlackBerry, BlackBerry Z10

With the release of the BlackBerry Z10 smartphone, the company once known as Research in Motion has staked its future on an ambitious bet: that it could craft a new "mobile user experience" that would, by itself, prove a strong attraction for buyers.

In practice, that means designing a new user interface that can smoothly exploit both the hardware and software features of not just the new smartphones, the all-touch Z10 and the qwerty-keyboard Q10, but also other types of mobile devices, from tablets to automotive systems to exotic embedded systems.

To any number of critics, even thinking about doing so was delusional. RIM, now called BlackBerry, had leveraged the success of its corporate, wireless email devices into smartphone products that grew rapidly in popularity during the mid-2000s. Then Apple introduced the iPhone in mid-2007 and changed the end user expectations about what a mobile device should be like. BlackBerry users were still growing fast, from 8 million in 2007 to 70 million in 2011.

[ FIRST LOOK: BlackBerry 10 smartphones ]

But it couldn't keep pace with the growth of Android and Apple. And its own growth slowed dramatically in 2011, accompanied by a plunge in the stock price, and a widely held view that BlackBerry was finished.

The jury is still out, but even most of the critical early reviews of the Z10 recognize the distinctiveness of the new UI. The BlackBerry Hub, a kind of integrated inbox for communications, alerts, and messaging and email, replaces the characteristic grid of apps that is the typical starting point for iOS and Android users today. The grid is still there, but you reach it with one of a new set of fluid gestures, which users have to invest some time in learning and practicing. The idea is that the Hub becomes both your focal and reference points, and from there you can bring up apps -- by a touch or a swipe -- in context with the tasks you want to perform.


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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